Upper Spring Creek Landcare Group and Mid Loddon CMN

Community caring for our environment

25 September, 2016
by wp possum
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News and floral displays

Sprinter is here for sure — and what a wet one!!

For very belated newsletter click

here:

NL- September 2016

And here are some pictures from the granite outcrop taken today. Many more than usual thanks to the rainfall!

Yellow bulbine lily Sept 2016

Yellow bulbine lily Sept 2016

 

Wax-lip orchid (Glossodia major) Sept 2016

Wax-lip orchid (Glossodia major) Sept 2016

Golden orchids

Golden orchids

Creamy candles (Stackhousia monogyna) Sept 2016

Creamy candles (Stackhousia monogyna) Sept 2016

Drosera peltata (Tall sundew) Sept 2016

Drosera peltata (Tall sundew) Sept 2016

Blue squill (Chamaescilla corybosa)

Blue squill (Chamaescilla corybosa)

Chocolate lily (Anthropodium strictum)

Chocolate lily (Anthropodium strictum)

24 July, 2016
by wp possum
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Lichen alliances

For 150 years, biologists have believed that lichens were a co-operation between a fungi and a microscopic algae — a symbiosis of two organisms. But over all that time, scientists have been unable to grow lichens in laboratories.

Lichens

Lichens

Recently, a researcher called Toby Spribille discovered the reason — there are not two, but three partners. ‘We now see that they require two different kinds of fungi and an algal species. If the right combination meet together on a rock or a twig, then a lichen will form, and this will result in the large and complex plant-like organisms we see on trees and rocks very commonly.’

For the full article see here:

http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/07/how-a-guy-from-a-montana-trailer-park-upturned-150-years-of-biology/491702/?utm_source=narratively&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=weekender07242016

 

24 July, 2016
by wp possum
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Weird and wonderful fungi in the forest

Landcare member, Cathy, sent in photos of this unusual fungus she saw recently.

Ileodictyon cibarium (Lattice or basket fungus)

Ileodictyon cibarium (Lattice or basket fungus)

A member of the Stinkhorn group, the stemless receptacle of this fungus emerges from its ‘egg’ at maturity, often quite suddenly. Not common, though widely distributed in forests, we have also seen these odd little fungi on the hill near our house.

 

 

 

13 June, 2016
by wp possum
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Weekend visitors

Lovely to have a long weekend. Our visitors Lee and Greg came exploring with us and took many pics of fungi and this other visitor to the hill:

Fan-tailed cuckoo

Fan-tailed cuckoo

These birds migrate to our region usually in late winter so this one is a bit early. We have never seen one on the hill before and this one perched just outside our kitchen window. Took us a while to identify!!

Fan tailed cuckoo visiting

Fan tailed cuckoo visiting

13 June, 2016
by wp possum
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Fungi everywhere you look!!

Walking in the rocky outcrops and woody grasslands is magical any time of year. After rain though, there are fungi wherever you look! And you have to be careful where you step lest you disturb a little forest.

Here are some we spotted yesterday in only an hour’s wandering.

Hydrocybe saltorivula (I think!!)

Hydrocybe saltorivula
(I think!!)

 

fungi  cones sheltering and recycling dead tree matter

fungi cones sheltering and recycling dead tree matter

Puff ball fungi ready to blow

Puff ball fungi ready to blow

Elegant tall stalks of fungi

Elegant tall stalks of fungi

This one has blown

This one has blown

Fan like fungus -- another Hygrcybe sp?

Fan like fungus — another Hygrocybe sp?

We could go on and on — what have you spotted in your neck of the woods?

12 June, 2016
by wp possum
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Wierd and wonderful fungi

After the recent rains, there are fungi popping up all over the place!

Frank and Jenny spotted these during their walks in the forest and sent in this post:

‘Ghosts in the Forest?

On a cool damp day last weekend, we went for a very pleasant walk into the Lockwood South Forest.  It was lovely to be so close to our home, yet find the forest so quiet, so fresh from the rain, and already showing signs of recovery after such a long hot summer.  As we covered the length of Briggs Road we came upon this impressive fungus specimen attached to the stump of a tree –  possibly a grey box –  that was harvested in the firewood felling program some few years ago.

Omphalotus nidiformis

A closer look at the photos once we were home again seems to indicate that this fungi is a Ghost Fungus (Omphalotus nidiformis) and it is said to have “an eerie white luminescence at night”.

Omphalotus nidiformis 2

Maybe we’ll leave confirming that property to another brave soul who is not scared of the forest in the dark!’

Thanks Jenny and Frank — you have shared one of the wonders of the box ironbark forest!!